From the Archives: My Bloody Valentine – Loveless

By: Jack Stein

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Imagine, if you will, a naive 16-year old listening to Loveless for the first time. As “Only Shallow” erupts with seismic fury through my shitty earbuds, the tectonic plates beneath my understanding of pop music shift haphazardly, beautifully, vexingly. Continue reading

This Isn’t Happening: A Prescriptive Guide for Ignoring Coachella Weekend 1

By: Jack Stein

The stuff of dreams.

Today is Friday the 13th (not that yours truly is superstitious in the least.)

It also happens to be, so I’m told, the opening of Coachella Weekend #1 in beautiful Indio, CA. As a Weekend #2 wristband holder, I await my turn in line with great anxiety, envy, and just a dash of contempt. Continue reading

From the Archives: Jeff Buckley – Grace

By: Jack Stein

The following is the first installment in a purported series, wherein the writers of jjmt look back fondly at some records/songs/artists that existed long before the dawn of this blog. Also, we get to prove that we listen to music outside the oh-so-hip confines of “indie”/”chillwave”/etc. etc. Enjoy.

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Allow me to preface this by stating that nothing Jeff Buckley ever recorded stands within the confines of what is considered “cool” by modern hypercritical and self-conscious standards. Continue reading

Take Care

A writer’s account of bridging the gap through a rap superstar

By: Jack Stein

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Part 1: The Chasm

As a white, twenty-something male teaching at a dilapidated public school amidst the industrial decay of northwest Indiana, I have found that establishing common ground with my students has been simultaneously the most challenging and rewarding part of the gig. Other than the fact that I’m young, not too far removed from juvenile humor myself (hell, I still partake in it regularly), and can rattle off NBA stats and storylines like a young Bethlehem Shoals, the chasm between myself and the students with whom I spend 6 hours a day is often a yawning one. Continue reading

J Dilla: A Tribute

By: Jack Stein

On February 10, 2006, we lost one of hip-hop’s preeminent visionaries, one James Yancey (ne “J Dilla”) to complications from lupus. The enigmatic Detroit-based producer spent the early portion of his career crate-digging to provide hypnotic, warped beats for the likes of A Tribe Called Quest and Busta Rhymes, but his contributions that truly resonate with the music of today took place during the last years of his life.

Continue reading